Two Hunts on Ulmo

6 Mar

In order to talk more specifically about fields on my P, I’ve decided to give them nicknames. I’ve been concentrating recently on a field I’ve called Ulmo. It’s where I took the landowner’s son when he found his Roman (apparently a family of Constantine nummus circa 340 A.D.). On two consecutive hunts (three if you count the one with the farmer’s son), Ulmo has given up Roman. The third day this was a very nice coin with victory on the reverse.

IMG_0580 IMG_0579 IMG_0565

March 2, 2015

The great find of the day (besides a grotty Roman) was my first Cartwheel penny, so called because of the thick rim around the periphery of the coin. They are massive and quite rare, from the reign of George III. They were produced for three years, but they all bear the mint year 1797. I’ve put the coin delicately into some olive oil to see if some of the encrustations can be teased away without damaging it.

Cartwheel Penny

Cartwheel Penny

IMG_0547 IMG_0546 IMG_0545

Cartwheel Penny

Cartwheel Penny

March 3, 2015

For this hunt I returned to Ulmo and fields adjacent. In my first hole I dug up the Roman pictured above. Anni thinks it is likely a local contemporary copy, because the victory on the reverse is facing the wrong way. This would make the coin quite rare and potentially valuable. It is currently being recorded for the PAS. Other finds included musket balls (up to a frightening caliber) and my first crotal bell, which happened to be complete. On a field I’ve called Oscar Wilde, I found a little silver-looking (but probably not silver) bow pin, as well as a George V penny (1918) in reasonable nick. Oh, and a fork…

IMG_0582

On Wednesday the Ashmolean Museum held their monthly find identification service. I invited my landowner to come along with me and bring the coin his son had found. The event is a great resource, with Anni Byard and three or four other archaeologists and numismatists on hand at a long table to meet with members of the public and ID finds. There is also the possibility to leave finds with the team for recording. I was very pleased that my farmer friend agreed to do so. The whole thing is like something out of Antiques Roadshow, with four lamps in a row to provide extra light, and the row of experts and the public bent toward each other, heads down over the objects under consideration. I turned twelve objects over to Anni for recording, though some are no doubt modern red herrings. Afterward, the farmer took me out to lunch at a local Thai restaurant. A lovely day all round.

Update: The bow pin found on Oscar Wilde has a lion silver hallmark on the back, so it may indeed be silver after all!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: